Macadamia Nuts

Macadamia nuts are indigenous to Australia, and they were the first country to start growing them commercially.

However, South Africa is now the world’s largest producer. This is due to poor weather conditions in Australia over the past few years, while South African orchards have now come into full productive maturity.

They are a niche product in the global nut market, with China and other Asian countries buying up the bulk of global production. As such, macadamias are not a key snacking nut in European markets.

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NUTRITIONAL INFO

Macronutrients

  • High in fibre
  • Low in salt
  • High in monounsaturated fat

 

Vitamins & Minerals

  • High in Thiamine
  • High in Manganese
  • High in Manganese and Copper. Source of Potassium, Magnesium and Phosphorus
COUNTRIES OF ORGIN
  • South Africa
  • Zimbabwe
  • Australia
  • Hawaii
HARVESTED

April and May

VARIETIES

Originally there were four indigenous species in Australia, two of which are edible. Most cultivars of macadamia descend from these two edible varieties, which are either smoothshelled or rough shelled, and hybrids occur naturally in the wild.

Growers also differentiate the different varieties by whether they are ‘droppers’ which drop from the tree when ripe, or ‘stickers’, which need to be cut down.

FORMATS
  • Whole
  • Whole Roasted
  • Halved
  • Nibbed
OTHER POINTS TO NOTE

Macadamias are the only native Australian crop that has ever been developed and traded as an international commercial food.
Although the first varieties introduced to Hawaii were intended to be used as ornamentals trees, by the 1950s they were an important commercial crop.