Linseed

Linseeds have been crushed to use for oil, and the seeds may be eaten raw, baked, or soaked. Grinding them releases more of the nutrients, but whole seeds add good flavour and crunch.

Historically used as a laxative, linseeds are high in phytoestrogens, and there is ongoing research into their role in helping the prevention of certain types of bowel cancer.

Linseeds are harvested when the seed heads turn golden brown – about 100 days after sowing.

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NUTRITIONAL INFO

Macronutrients

  • Source of protein
  • High in fibre
  • Low in salt
  • High in polyunsaturated fats

 

Vitamins & Minerals

  • High in Thiamine and Folic acid
  • High in Manganese, Magnesiuim, Phosphorus and Copper
COUNTRIES OF ORGIN
  • UK
  • France
HARVESTED

September

VARIETIES

Linseed comes from the common flax plant Linum usitatissimum. The same plant provides the fibres that have been used to make linen.
Linseed is often called Flax or Flaxseed.
The Americans use Flax to differentiate the culinary varieties from industrial linseed.
Linseed comes in brown and golden varieties.

FORMATS
  • Golden Linseed
  • Brown Linseed
OTHER POINTS TO NOTE

Linseed oil has been used in industry for centuries, but culinary oil is also available. However, it has a very low flash point, so cannot be used for frying as it burns very quickly, and the nutrients are destroyed.