Currants

Traditional or ‘true’ currants grow on a bush, and come in black, red and white varieties.
However, the currants more commonly used in baking are in fact, tiny varieties of dried grapes, known as Zante raisins or Zante currants to differentiate them from true currants.
The Greek island of Zante (Zakynthos) was a major exporter of these currants at this time.

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NUTRITIONAL INFO

Macronutrients

  • Source of fibre
  • Low in salt
  • Naturally occurring sugars

 

Vitamins & Minerals

  • High in Potassium and Copper
COUNTRIES OF ORGIN
  • Greece

 

HARVESTED

August and September

VARIETIES

The Black Corinth grape is the main cultivar grown for currants, which is more often known by the name Vostizza.
Provincial is another small, dark grape variety which is commonly used.

FORMATS
  • Whole dried
OTHER POINTS TO NOTE

The confusing, and somewhat misleading name is believed to have come about when the import of true currants to the US was banned in 1911 amid fears of disease affecting the timber industry.
When Greece started importing their tiny Zante raisins into the United States a few years later, the grape variety on the first imports was ‘Corinth’.
As the US had not seen currants for many years, it is believed a simple misinterpretation of the paperwork changed ‘Corinth’ into ‘Currants’, and the American public now recognise Zante raisins as currants.